Facebook Calls On Users To Send Nudes In Revenge Porn Crackdown

Facebook

Facebook

Basically, once a user sends their nude photos to Facebook, the company can "hash" the images and specifically find ways to recognise and block them if they pop up anywhere else on Facebook, Messenger, or Instagram.

Users wanting to take part in the scheme must first complete an online form on the Australian e-safety commissioner's website.

Facebook is testing out a pilot program in Australia to prevent revenge porn.

If it violates Facebook policies, the company would create a digital fingerprint of the picture so that it could be recognized and blocked if its uploaded again.

Target Releases Black Friday Ad, Offers Early Access Deals

Facebook wants your nudes.

In response to the revelations, Facebook introduced a feature that tagged pictures reported to it as revenge porn using photo-matching technology.

The pilot program is being tested in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada. The potential victim will then be instructed to send the images to their own Facebook account via the platform's Messenger system. "Yes, they're not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed".

"We've been participating in the Global Working Group to identify new solutions to keep people safe, and we're proud to partner with Facebook on this important initiative as it aims to empower Australians to stop image-based abuse in its tracks", said Julie Inman Grant, eSafety Commissioner.

Scottish Parliament Evacuated Over Suspicious Packages
The Scottish parliament has confirmed that evacuation, with police dealing with the incident that occurred at 11.30 am local time. According to the Mirror, a suspicious substance was found in a letter sent to an MSP's office, RT reported.

"We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly", she told ABC News.

The scheme is aimed at people who are anxious partners or ex-partners may share the images without their consent - and is being trialled in Australia, the US, Canada and the UK.

"To prevent adversarial reporting, at this time we need to have humans review the images in a controlled, secure environment", Stamos further explained on Twitter.

Facebook tests new way to combat revenge porn
Once the photo has been uploaded, Facebook's hashing system can recognize the photo without it being visible to the public. CNBC reports Facebook's anti-revenge porn pilot program is available in the U.S., U.K., and Canada.

Latest News